Native SpeciesSpotted salamander

Ambystoma maculatum
FOUND by 4hblue
2018-05-07
Wells
ID Confirmed
Quality checked by Trevor Hopwood
Peer reviewed by
Field Notes
I can hear a lot of kids screaming, this is from the playground. I smell pine and mist. I touch the cold water. I wonder how long a spotted salamander can breath or stay underwater?
Supporting Evidence
Photo of my evidence.
We know its a spotted salamander because the egg mass it a thick layer of jelly and a wood frog has a thin layer of jelly on their egg masses. It looks like there is about 10 to 100 eggs in each egg mass.
Species Observation: Species Looked For
Did you find it?: 
I think I found it
Scientific name:
Ambystoma maculatum
Common name:
Spotted salamander
Sampling method: 
Just looking around
Photo of our sampling method.
Place Studied
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Map this species
Latitude: 
N 43.319543 °
Longitude: 
W -70.594333 °
Observation Site Information
A photo of our study site.
Habitat: 
Freshwater - In a developed area
Trip Information
Name:
Wells Elementary Vernal Pool, April/May 2018
Trip date: 
Mon, 2018-05-07 13:54
Town or city: 
Wells
Type of investigation: 
Species Survey
Ecosystem: 
Freshwater
Watershed: 
Piscataqua
MIDAS Code: 

Comments

Nice job! Notice how some of the eggs have a greenish color to them? That's from an algae called Oophila amblystomatis. The algae provides oxygen to the developing salamander embryo, and the algae benefits by receiving nitrogen-rich waste produced by the salamander.